Marijuana brands can trademark almost anything, except marijuana

Marijuana brands can trademark almost anything, except marijuana

The Columbian / Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Hi is a cannabis brand. Its logo — “hi” in white letters inside an orange circle — can be found above the front door of a Portland marijuana shop and on a handful of cannabis products, including massage oil and Hi Releaf pain-relief balm.

But you wouldn’t guess any of that from Hi’s trademark filings. In 2015, the brand’s parent company, Cannabis Sativa Inc., filed a trademark application — not for any of Hi’s core products, but for hats, T-shirts and a wide array of other apparel.

If the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office signs off on the application, Cannabis Sativa would be able to stop other companies from using the Hi brand on clothing, but it might not be able to stop rivals from setting up Hi-brand marijuana shops or selling knockoff Hi-brand products.

This is the odd state of affairs for trademark protection in the cannabis industry, one of the many byproducts of the gap between state and federal marijuana laws.

Though cannabis is legal for recreational or medicinal use in 28 states, it remains illegal under federal law. As a result, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will not register trademarks for marijuana retailers or for products that contain cannabis.

“You want to protect what you’re doing with the brand name,” said David Tobias, president of publicly traded Cannabis Sativa, “but you have to dance around it.”

One popular strategy for cannabis companies that can’t trademark their core products is to seek protection for a host of ancillary products and services.

“I call it the ‘circle the wagons’ approach,” said Todd Winter, an attorney outside Los Angeles who works with marijuana companies. “We get everything trademarked that we can, tangential to the actual cannabis product itself.”

The idea, one that is largely untested so far, is that if a cannabis company registers its trademark for other products, that will scare off would-be copycats and allow the company to be first in line if the federal government eases its stance on pot.

Cannabis Sativa applied for an apparel trademark and hopes to put its Hi brand on other products, including lozenges for smokers.

Stoner comedian Tommy Chong’s brand, Chong’s Choice, which sells a line of pre-rolled marijuana cigarettes, has applied for a trademark for vaporizers and “tobacco” jars.

Related products

Altai, a brand of cannabis chocolates, is seeking trademark protection for its name brand as a provider of information about medical cannabis.

Mary Shapiro, a San Francisco attorney, said the goal is to get something federally trademarked — and the more closely related to marijuana, the better. She is working with Salinas firm Indus Holdings, Altai’s parent company, on its trademark application.

Once a company has even applied to register a trademark, it’s noted in a federal database. When companies set out to submit trademark applications of their own, they search that database to see if their brand name is already in use — and if so, how it’s being used.

The goal of trademark law is to prevent consumer confusion, and different companies can use the same name for products as long as their products are in different categories and wouldn’t cause confusion.

The Patent and Trademark Office would likely reject a trademark application for a soap brand with a name similar to Unilever’s Dove, for instance, but it didn’t stop candy company Mars from trademarking Dove-brand chocolate.

The same rules apply in the cannabis industry, but it’s tricky. Unilever can make clear in its trademark application that Dove makes soap, which lets other companies know they shouldn’t try applying for a similar trademark for soap-related products.

Cannabis companies, however, have to be more circumspect, hoping that a trademark for rolling papers or providing cannabis information will be enough of a hint that a company has laid claim to a cannabis-related trademark.

“It raises a red flag that there’s a company already operating in the space,” Shapiro said. “Basically, it’s a warning sign that someone else has claimed rights to the name in connection to cannabis.”

Along with scaring off potential competitors, there’s another potential benefit: If the Patent and Trademark Office were to start approving trademarks for cannabis products, companies with cannabis-related marks could be first in line.

Going back to that notion of preventing confusion, trademark protection can apply not only to products a company makes now, but to products that a company might reasonably be expected to make later on — what trademark lawyers call the zone of natural expansion.

Even before Unilever started making Dove-brand shampoo, it would have been hard for another firm to trademark that name, as consumers might reasonably expect Dove soap and shampoo to come from the same company.

That’s why Winter is helping one of his clients, Arizona cannabis candy company Baked Bros, apply for a trademark on syrups and gummy candies that contain CBD, a hemp extract that’s available nationwide. The Patent and Trademark office has approved trademarks for other products containing CBD.

Winter said CBD is about as close to marijuana as the trademark office will go. If the office approves Bake Bros’ application, Winter said he believes marijuana products would be within the company’s zone of expansion.

“From a legal standpoint, if you have a hemp-based product under your brand, no one will be able to get a cannabis-related trademark for a similar brand,” he said.

Still, the “circle the wagons” strategy isn’t foolproof, and it comes with challenges of its own. To get and keep a trademark, companies actually have to use it.

To maintain its “hi” clothing trademark, Cannabis Sativa will actually have to sell some clothes. They’re not widely available for now, though Hal Lewis, the company’s national sales manager, said he plans to launch an online store this year. Chong’s Choice will have to keep selling jars and vaporizers, which are available online and at marijuana shops in a few states.

That represents a threat for cannabis brands. If customers love a company’s weed but not its other products, the company could lose its trademark altogether, said Alison Malsbury, another attorney who specializes in cannabis trademarks.

“The Patent and Trademark Office is looking for more than just token sales,” she said. “If you’re not continually using the trademark, it can be canceled and you can lose everything.”

What’s more, she and other attorneys note that the strategy cannabis companies are using remains untested. Unless and until the federal government decides to allow cannabis trademarks, companies can’t be sure their cannabis-adjacent trademarks will be able to carry over to pot products. And so far, there’s been little legal squabbling between cannabis companies, meaning there’s not much precedent for companies to rely on.

“We don’t really have any test cases,” Malsbury said.

But that could change as the cannabis industry continues to grow. Winter suspects disputes between cannabis companies have been rare in part because the industry is tightknit.

As money floods in and competition heats up, he expects companies to develop sharper elbows.

“There’s a fair amount of peer pressure within the industry to not use someone else’s brand,” he said. “But that’s changing a little with the dynamic of multimillionaires and billionaires investing in the industry.”

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 18 Jan 2017 14:00:42 +0000

What Trump means for legal weed in Washington: We ask a pot pioneer

What Trump means for legal weed in Washington: We ask a pot pioneer

The Columbian / Associated Press

He sat between Whoopi Goldberg and Barbara Walters on “The View,” parried with Stephen Colbert on the Comedy Channel, and declined Bill O’Reilly’s repeated offers to appear on his show.

As the first mainstream newspaper editor in the U.S. dedicated to covering legal weed, Ricardo Baca blazed a trail few of us could’ve imagined a few years ago.

He led The Denver Post’s creation of The Cannabist, a digital publication focused on all things weed. The Cannabist staff grew from two to seven people last year, it got more page views than High Times, and made enough money to support itself while adding — modestly, Baca said — to The Post’s bottom line.

The Cannabist also was the subject of a documentary film, “Rolling Papers.” Fortune magazine ranked Baca as one of the seven most powerful people in American cannabis and the Brookings Institution said he’s one of 12 people to watch on marijuana policy.

Baca announced last month he was leaving The Cannabist to take a position at a technology startup in Denver.

“Once we launch in several months we will be servicing marijuana businesses all over world,” he told The Seattle Times. Until then Baca is not disclosing more about the name of the company, who he’s working with and what they’re doing.

The Seattle Times talked with Baca about his pioneering gig.

The Seattle Times: Voters in Washington and Colorado approved legal weed at the same time, in the November 2012 election. What’s the different about the two states and weed?

Baca: The biggest difference is implementation time and you guys taking five-plus months more and what it meant for rollout and coverage. (Colorado began legal sales in January 2014; Washington started in July 2014.) For those five-plus months there was only Colorado. Before you guys ever came on line, I was writing front-page stories and taping the documentary that turned out to be “Rolling Papers.”

There’s a minor difference in shopping. Everything is prepackaged in Washington, while Colorado is still an open-jar experience (with customers selecting buds from big glass jars). It’s also worth noting on the cultivation side we allow six to 12 plants per household and we only have one county that allows outdoor cultivation.

Any predictions for Washington consumers?

We are entering the time where regulators have had opportunities to tweak and tickle the rules in place. I think now we can start tackling some of the smaller problems like home-growing. I think it’s a shame that individuals in Washington can’t grow at home, given all we know about this substance and that it is safer and less deadly than other substances including nicotine and alcohol. It’s hypocritical, ridiculous and shortsighted. I also think social use or public consumption needs to be addressed. … The places to legally consume weed you’re legally buying is infinitesimal. … It’s hypocritical to allow tourists to buy and then don’t give them any opportunity to consume that substance.

When do you think pot will be legalized nationally?

A: I think 10 years is a good number. Here we are four years into this experiment … granted it’s only the tip of the iceberg, but we finally have this data disproving so many fears and propaganda. Once we have more robust data I don’t see how people can keep this substance prohibited. I think in 10 years we’ll see some form of federal legalization because it allows some interstate commerce. We’ll just have everything grown (outdoors) in Northern California and they can supply the rest of the country. … It’s going to make a lot more sense. I believe 1 percent of Colorado’s overall energy use is by indoor cannabis growers using massive amounts of energy. Just like avocados and almonds, most of our cannabis should be grown in California and trucked to us.

Isn’t it sad that pioneers in our states could get left by the wayside?

There’s a lot of potential for sadness. Eventually federal legalization is going to happen and if you’re not the best of the best in Colorado and Washington, you’re probably not going to have your business for much longer.

What does Donald Trump mean for legal weed?

I’m one of the voices that doesn’t believe Trump means the end of the legal marijuana experiment. He has been very clear he’s pro-states’ rights. (Trump’s nominee for U.S. Attorney General) Jeff Sessions had mixed messages in his Senate confirmation hearings (this week). Given all their other priorities, I can’t imagine where that leaves them time for legalization. They can read polls from the nation’s most legitimate pollsters saying the nation as a whole wants legalization. The last election was such a definitive win, with eight of nine states voting for legalization (of recreational or medical marijuana). Are you really going to go after weed when medical marijuana is now legal in Arkansas? I think it’s past the tipping point.

Your favorite interview?

After 15 years of requesting interviews with Willie Nelson (Baca was previously a music critic) I got an hour on the tour bus with Willie in San Diego. … I ended up with such a spectacular experience at a table opposite him in the Honeysuckle Rose. I told him, ‘I love your music but I want to spend all my time talking about cannabis.’ He said, ‘All right, go for it.’ I appreciated hearing him talk about his first experience with the plant. He had a booze problem and he smoked too much and was playing rough and tumble roadhouses around Fort Worth when he found cannabis was a substance that didn’t make him crazy or put him in compromising positions that getting hammered on alcohol does. It was a compelling story and it was also my story. Once I did discover cannabis four or five years ago I learned instantly this is my intoxicant of choice. More and more, as I talk to people I realize I’m just one of many.

The most surprising thing you learned on the job?

I think it all comes down to reefer madness and going back to your own high-school education and thinking about all the (nonsense) we’ve been told about cannabis destroying lives. Of course weed is not without its dangers and not for everyone. But when I finally dug into the beat and talked to doctors and researchers about what we know, and then learned about the Nixon administration and how they pretty much made up the War on Drugs and started a smear campaign against cannabis.

I grew up as a pretty good kid. I kept my nose clean. I trusted presidents and teachers and then to have my world view shattered made me more cynical.We’re about to say goodbye to our first living president who said cannabis is no more dangerous than alcohol.

I’m thrilled to be part of a movement that helped to spread fact-based, science-based quality information on a substance so maligned over the decades. If in the end I helped stamped out any misinformation about weed then I did my job.

(Why?)

Published at Sat, 14 Jan 2017 14:00:41 +0000

White Widow Marijuana Strain Overview

White Widow Marijuana Strain Overview

White Widow, a hybrid originating in the Netherlands, is one of the most popular strains across the globe.

white widowWhite Widow is a hugely popular strain (and for good reason). This is especially true in the U.S., where it’s sold in cannabis outlets and dispensaries throughout the country. It’s also true in the Netherlands, where it’s sold in many cannabis coffee shops (some of which have been selling it since the 90s).

The cross between South Indian (an indica) and Brazilian (a sativa) has a strong, earthy (sometime wood-like) smell and taste. Many find it best used at night when attempting to relax or get to sleep.

The top effects of the White Widow marijuana strain are:

  • Relaxation
  • Hunger
  • A very strong but pleasant head high
  • Happiness and also
  • Calmness

Medical properties:

Some of the top medical ailments it helps with are:

  • Insomnia
  • Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Depression and also
  • Anxiety

Growing information:

White Widow is a relatively easy strain to grow with a typically medium yield and plant height It’s also best grown indoors.

Below are a few growing tips specific to this strain courtesy of Leafly:

  • Suitable for sea of green (SOG) and screen of green (SCROG) setups.
  • Fertilize and water in moderation to avoid mildew and to preserve flavor profiles.
  • Changing light cycle to 8 hours during the final 2 weeks of flowering prevents regrowth of buds; stress will induce better resin coverage.
  • Needs a lot of sun outdoors, but is suitable for colder climates.

Reviews:

At the time of publication White Widow has 2,067 reviews on Leafly with an average score of 4.3 out of 5 (8.8 out of 10).

Where to find it

If you are lucky enough to live in a state where cannabis is legal for medical and/or recreational purposes, we suggest you check out Leafly’s strain finder.

This feature uses your exact location to find the closet cannabis store or dispensary to you that is currently carrying the White Widow marijuana strain; you can also look for a variety of other strains.

Click here for the strain finder.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Sun, 15 Jan 2017 23:04:31 +0000

First Medical Cannabis Research Center To Open In The USA

First Medical Cannabis Research Center To Open In The USA

Cannabis Education and Research gets Healthy Injection

The “miraculous lifesaving benefits of medicinal cannabis derived from hemp”, in the words of Barry Lambert, is what coaxed this Australian philanthropist to donate $ 3 Million dollar to the Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. A new medical center, officially named The Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp will be the first medical center in the USA for research on medical cannabis.

It will enable the center to further the therapeutic potential of a wide range of cannabinoids, like Cannabidiol as well as chemical variants that are still lesser known.

The Lamberts have firsthand experience of the healing power of hemp when, as an infant, their granddaughter was diagnosed with Dravet syndrome. Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has an effect on the brain’s electric signaling system and as a result causes severe and repetitive seizures. Cannabis from hemp brought great relief to their granddaughter.

The money will be used for research into the therapeutic potential of medicinal cannabis and also the potential health benefits of hemp, the non- psychoactive part of the cannabis plant. For centuries, hemp was known to be used in textiles, paper, ropes and cords, but now it will be studied for the medicinal cannabinoids in its composure and the benefits derived from it.

The Jefferson University from the start had it on their agenda to study the science around the therapeutic use of cannabinoids and its variants.

Why research is needed

In order to understand what the total effect of all the cannabinoids and other chemical compositions are, research centers are of utmost importance.  With cannabis still being seen as a Schedule 1 drug under Federal Law, universities and medical institutes are in desperate need of funding to do research and money is not easily available.

In this case a donation was given due to a positive personal experience in seeing firsthand how effective treatment with cannabis oil was. Treatment with hemp oil brought relief to something as severe as Dravet Syndrome.

What is Dravet Syndrome and how can it be treated by Cannabis?

Dravet Syndrome is a rare and incurable form of epilepsy in infants. It often starts at the age of 6 months. Apart from brain seizures, infants often develop other kinds of seizures too. It could be non-conclusive myoclonic eye-lid seizures.

The initial development of the child looks as if it on track, but around the second year a drastic decline is noticed. In addition, the child can have seizures without the normal triggers like high fever or illnesses. It is also hard to treat the seizures as they resist treatments and happen frequently. To maintain a level of quality of life, multiple drugs are needed with other side effects.

Treatment also has to be tailored to each child as it is a spectrum disorder and the course of Dravet syndrome varies. It also bring with a number of other conditions namely chronic infection, delayed growth, delayed language and speech acquisition, difficulty sleeping, behavioral and emotional delay in development, dysfunctional autonomic nervous system, impaired balance and mobility, problems with nutritional uptake and issues with bone formation and growth.

Treatment with cannabis and its effect- A family in Colorado was also desperate to find treatment for their child and worked together with a medical dispensary to grow a specific strain of cannabis with higher levels of CBD and lower levels of THC. The successful treatment on the symptoms of Dravet Syndrome became a gateway for other children to gain access. They called the strain Charlotte’s web, after their daughter.

Studies are still relatively young in the medical world with regards to cannabis treatment and it is still controversial whether children should receive cannabis at all for treatment. But in a study done at Stanford in 2013, parents indicated in a survey that on average 12 common prescribed medications failed to control the symptoms their children experienced. 84% said the cannabis-enriched treatments reduced the symptoms significantly. In 11 % of the children the seizures stopped completely. In 42 percent of the children the seizures were 80% less frequent. 32 percent of the children experienced 25 – 60 percent less frequent seizures. The only side effect noticed in some kids was drowsiness and fatigue.

Landmark moves make wonders happen. In the world of medical cannabis, more research is always necessary and more visionaries like the Lamberts are needed. Dravet Syndrome is but one condition that benefit from cannabis. The world is more than ready for the healing powers of cannabis.

What would happen if we unleashed the floodgates of cannabis research? Odds are we’d find a less toxic replacement for a wide slew of drugs currently being slung for the sake of corporate profits. It’s time we allow real competition within the medical field…cannabis is the number one contender.

OTHER STORIES YOU MAY ENJOY…

OILS TO TREAT AUTISM, EPILEPSY, AND CANCER ARE DIFFERENT, CLICK HERE.

OR..

CANNABIS SUCCESSFULLY TREATS INFANT WITH EPILEPSY, CLICK HERE.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 06 Jan 2017 06:00:00 +0000

Girl Scout Cookies Marijuana Strain Overview

Girl Scout Cookies Marijuana Strain Overview

Girl Scout Cookies has quickly become one of, it not the most popular marijuana strains. Here’s a look at why.

Girl Scout Cookies Marijuana Strain

Girl Scout Cookies marijuana strain. (Photo: Medical Jane)

If you’re a cannabis consumer, you’ve likely heard of the Girl Scout Cookies marijuana strain; there’s also a good chance you’ve tried it. The cross between OG Kush and Durban Poison is know for its sweet smell. It’s also know for its excellent test and uplifting high.

This hybrid marijuana strain tends to be high in THC, and has been the recipient of numerous cannabis cup contests.

According to Leafly, the top effects of the Girl Scout Cookies marijuana strain are:

  • Happy
  • Relaxed
  • Euphoric
  • Uplifted
  • Creative

The top medical ailments it helps with are:

  • Stress
  • Pain
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Lack of appetite

Growing information:

  • 60 day flowering window with a typically low yield of 25 to 30 grams per plant
  • Prefers moderate amounts of fertilizer
  • Trains well as a multi-branched plant or with sea of green (SOG) operations

Where it can be found:

If you live in a state where cannabis is legal for medical and/or recreational purposes, we suggest you check out Leafly’s strain finder; this uses your location to find the closet cannabis store/dispensary to you that is currently carrying Girl Scout Cookies marijuana strain. This can be found by clicking here.

May not have a future in the legal marijuana industry – at least in name:

Recently Oregon officials banned the use of the name Girl Scout Cookies as a marijuana strain. They argued they it appealed to kids. Whether or not that’s true, it’s possible that other states will follow suit. If they don’t, it’s quite possible that it could become a copyright issue which could prevent its use. However, the solution is easy; simply rename it to something else. Or, as many have suggested, simply use its acronym GSC, which many already know and use.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 06 Jan 2017 06:12:27 +0000

Indica or Sativa: What’s the Difference?

Indica or Sativa: What’s the Difference?

What are the differences between indica and sativa marijuana strains?

(Photo: Leafscience.com)

When purchasing marijuana, you might notice that strains are separated into three types; sativa, indica and hybrid, which is a mix of the two. These different species have varying effects when consumed; they also grow slightly differently.

Indica Marijuana Strains

Indica strains tend to have a much stronger “head high” than sativas; this results in a relaxed experience that’s excellent for insomnia and pain relief. Most people find indicas a little too heavy to take during the day; at least if you plan to do much more than hang out at home and play video games (not necessarily a bad thing).

As a plant, indica marijuana strains tend to be shorter and wider than sativa plants, growing between 3.2 to 9.8 feet tall. Indica marijuana plants flower considerably faster than sativas, and are more easily influenced by an alternation of light cycles.

Below is a list of some of the most popular indica marijuana strains on the market:

  • Northern Lights

    Pineapple kush.

  • Pineapple Kush
  • ICE
  • OG Kush
  • Blue Mystic

Sativa Marijuana Strains

Sativa strains tend to be more popular than indica strains, especially among new consumers. They tend to have a much more energizer and uplifiting high; this makes it suitable for daytime use.

Although sativa strains aren’t as strong or “heavy” as indica strains, they still have vast medical value; they are particularly useful for anxiety, increasing appetite, reducing nausea and a large number of other things.

As a plant, sativa marijuana strains are taller and thinner than indica strains; in some cases they can reach up to 20 feet in length, though are more often somewhere between 8 and 12 feet.

Below is a list of some of the most popular sativa marijuana strains on the market:

  • Maui Waui

    Chocolope. (Photo: AllBud.com)

  • Chocolope
  • Laughing Buddha
  • Strawberry Cough
  • Amnesia Haze

Hybrid Marijuana Strains

Hybrid marijuana strains are a combination of sativa and indica. This may be a 50/50 split, or it may be more of an 80/20 split.

Below is a list of some of the most popular hybrid marijuana strains on the market:

  • Tahoe OG Kush

    Girl Scout Cookies.

  • Death Star
  • Mango Kush
  • Girl Scouts Cookies
  • Bruce Banner

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Thu, 05 Jan 2017 09:40:04 +0000

Cannabics announces new 5mg THC cannabis capsule for cancer patients

Cannabics announces new 5mg THC cannabis capsule for cancer patients

Cannabics Pharmaceuticals Inc. (CNBX) today announced development of Cannabics 5mg THC Capsule intended for naïve patient who have not tried cannabis in the past. Dr. Eyal Ballan, Chief scientist of Cannabics Pharmaceuticals stated: “Our mission is to find the right balance between efficacy on the one hand and the elimination of undesired psychoactive effects on other.”

The Cannabics 5mg THC capsule is currently being evaluated by the company in a clinical study as a palliative treatment, which is conducted by the oncology department at the Rambam Medical Center in northern Israel and under strict regulations of the Ministry of Health, by whom Cannabics Pharmaceuticals has been licensed since 2014.

The study is fully registered with the US NIH under “Cannabics Capsules as Treatment to Improve Cancer Related CACS in Advanced Cancer Patients”, Identifier NCT02359123, and may be found at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02359123

“The majority of our cancer trial patients have no previous experience with Cannabis, hence this recalibration of the THC level may be more amenable. We believe there is a significant potential medical market for our 5mg THC capsule in countries that have now instituted medical cannabis regulations,” said Itamar Borochov, CEO of Cannabics Pharmaceuticals Inc.

About Cannabics Pharmaceuticals Inc.

Cannabics Pharmaceuticals Inc. (OTCQB: CNBX), a U.S based public company, is dedicated to the development of Personalized Anti-Cancer and Palliative treatments. The Company’s R&D is based in Israel, where it is licensed by the Ministry of Health for its work in both scientific and clinical research. The Company’s focus is on harnessing the therapeutic properties of natural Cannabinoid formulations and diagnostics. Cannabics’ vision is to create individually tailored natural therapies for cancer patients, utilizing advanced screening systems and personalized bioinformatics tools.

Disclaimer:

Certain statements contained in this release may constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements include, but are not limited to statements identified by words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “plans,” “targets,” “projects” and similar expressions. The statements in this release are based upon the current beliefs and expectations of our company’s management and are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Numerous factors could cause or contribute to such differences, including, but not limited to, results of clinical trials and/or other studies, the challenges inherent in new product development initiatives, the effect of any competitive products, our ability to license and protect our intellectual property, our ability to raise additional capital in the future that is necessary to maintain our business, changes in government policy and/or regulation, potential litigation by or against us, any governmental review of our products or practices, as well as other risks discussed from time to time in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including, without limitation, our latest 10-K Report filed on December 13th, 2016. We undertake no duty to update any forward-looking statement or any information contained in this press release or in other public disclosures at any time.

For Further Information, please contact:

Cannabics Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
+1-877-424-2429
Info@Cannabics.com
http://www.Cannabics.com

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:25:49 +0000

I Am Not Your Stereotype #IsmokeWeed

I Am Not Your Stereotype #IsmokeWeed

Confessions Of A Stoned, Suburban Soccer Mom

Confessions of A Suburban, Stoner Soccer Mom… I have a confession to make.  I live in the suburbs, have 3 kids, drive a minivan, and I want to get stoned.  I want to get stoned as stress relief, instead of hitting the wine isle like all the other Moms.

This article passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.
Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Sun, 01 Jan 2017 06:00:00 +0000

President Obama Grants Clemency to 231 People, Largest in U.S. History

President Obama Grants Clemency to 231 People, Largest in U.S. History

President Obama today granted clemency to 231 people; this is the largest single day act of clemency in U.S. history.

President ObamaThe large majority of those receiving clemency were charged with non-violent drug crimes. President Obama has now granted clemency to 1,324 people, including 395 serving life sentences; this is well more than the past 11 presidents combined.

“The 231 individuals granted clemency today have all demonstrated that they are ready to make use — or have already made use — of a second chance,” White House Counsel Neil Eggleston said in a statement. “While each clemency recipient’s story is unique, the common thread of rehabilitation underlies all of them”.

The Washington Post has lists of the names of those receiving clemency, including the crimes they committed; for a list of the 150 people receiving commutations click here. For a list of the 70 inmates receiving pardons click here.

“Today’s grants signify the President’s continued commitment to exercising his clemency authority through the remainder of his time in office” says Eggleston. “In 2016 alone, the President has granted clemency to more than 1,000 deserving individuals.”

He continues; “The mercy that the President has shown his 1,324 clemency recipients is remarkable, but we must remember that clemency is a tool of last resort and that only Congress can achieve the broader reforms needed to ensure over the long run that our criminal justice system operates more fairly and effectively in the service of public safety.”

There is still a chance that Obama will grant clemency to more individuals before he leaves office, though he’ll have to do so quick; he has just one month left before President-elect Donald Trump takes over.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

Published at Tue, 20 Dec 2016 04:53:27 +0000

New Hampshire Senate Minority leader to Introduce Cannabis Legalization Bill

New Hampshire Senate Minority leader to Introduce Cannabis Legalization Bill

New Hampshire Senate Minority leader Jeff Woodburn (D-Dalton) has announced that he will soon introduce legislation to legalize recreational cannabis.

Senate Minority leader “I think they have forced us to look at our laws and regulations,” says Woodburn, referring to Canada and the fact that their government is in the process of legalizing cannabis. “What we can’t control is what’s happening all around us. We can’t put our heads in the snow.”

Woodburn’s bill will be modeled after successful legalization efforts in other states such as Colorado, where the possession and licensed distribution of small amounts of cannabis is legal for those who are 21 and older. Cannabis will be taxed, though Woodburn hasn’t announced what the rate will be set at; he also hasn’t announced the exact possession limit.

“I’m very, very pleased with Sen. Woodburn’s decision to show leadership on the legalization issue;” says Matt Simon, New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project. “It’s an issue that people are looking for leadership on, and there’s not been a lot of leadership in the senate.”

Unfortunately Governor-elect Chris Sununu has stated that he doesn’t support legalizing cannabis. He does, however, support decriminalizing cannabis, which is also expected to be discussed in the upcoming legislative session (starting January).

According to a WMUR/Granite State Poll conducted in March, 62% of adults in New Hampshire support legalizing cannabis.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

Published at Sun, 18 Dec 2016 20:52:49 +0000